Portrait of Harringworth Viaduct 8- Little Red House – final shots

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Here we have my final shots of the little red house under  Harringworth viaduct.

I have always loved red brick and when it’s aged like this I think it’s so beautiful.

So what was it for… read on.

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In the photo above if you look carefully you will see there is an iron hook to the right of the door just over half way up.

The post you can see in the ground in the photos above and below is thick and wooden with lots of what appear to be cut marks on it but no idea what it’s for!

 Any guesses what hook or post might be for?

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The window had a hole in the top ( might be a knot in the wood though) and what appeared to be a loose iron rivet in a hole at the bottom. Again no idea why.

Any thoughts on this ?

I was hoping to be able to show you something interesting inside but alas there was nothing interesting at all just straight walls and a red brick floor. You can just about see the far wall through the window. On that far wall there was another window which has been bricked up.

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So what was this little building for?  Well the only thing I could find online was this:-

 “This Viaduct, completed in 1878,  spans the Welland (river) from Seaton to
Harringworth.
2,500 men helped to build it, and they were paid between
£1 and £3 per week, according to their skills. Huts were erected to house
these workers, and the Railway Mission came to try to convert them. They were
said to be a ‘rough and ready lot’ by the local residents, and were often
caught drunk or poaching. “

Though I know the huts mentioned were wooden I still like to think of a couple of rough and ready cloth-capped workers going to this shed to shelter from the weather or maybe they made illicit liquor in there or kept pigs or goats and tied them to the post to graze!! !!

Addendum 30th may 2012 -See Kenny’s comment below which I’ve copied here –

Hi, I live locally to Harringworth and also know some Harringworth folk, born and bred. They assure me that these are workers cottages built around the time of the construction of the viaduct.

The holes in the window frame were for securing shutters, from the inside.

The wooden post I am told is missing another post parallel to it, and a handle…and a….sharpening stone. The cut marks you see are the result of workers drawing their tools across the wood just to see how sharp they have made their blades. At least one stone still exists in one of the gardens in Harringworth.

There are also two more huts. One is vandalised, but you should find another at the Seaton end of the viaduct.

So the mystery of the little red house is solved.. Thank you so much to Kenny 😀

You can see my other Viaduct photos here  

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and the other “Portraits of” in the series  here

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If you care to you can also read my other blog 1500 Saturdays here

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29 thoughts on “Portrait of Harringworth Viaduct 8- Little Red House – final shots

  1. I agree that it’s surprising so few have photographed this little red hut. You have redressed the balance a little though. A really enjoyable series. I am intrigued by the possible purpose of this hut too. No ideas though.

    • Will probably never know 😦 but of course it may be nothing to do with the train history or building of the actual viaduct. It may well be a farm building built much later to take advantage of the shelter under the arch.

    • Actually I guess it’s not photographed much because you can’t easily see it. It’s not visible from the road for example so you have to either come upon it by accident as I did or actively seek it out. Access is not where you would normally view from either.

  2. Why would such a simple hut require a thick concrete roof and evidence of bitumen or tar just below the roof? I think the brickwork is probably much older and this roof was added later to keep the contents dry, whatever they were – surely not workmen.

    • Good points Louis. It’s a good way from the road ( or the road where it currently is) probably 100 metres or more – I’m not good at distances!! but it’s not next to a road is what I’m getting at I suppose. I do intend to go back across there at some point to explore the ends of the Viaduct and to see if I can find out more.. I’ve quite fallen in love with the place!

  3. Always loved red as a colour. Just looked at the portraits and loved them. Weird, but as much as i love red, am totally in love with green as well. I am looking at the green just besides the “log”. Just at the foot of the wall on the second photo. I love the arrangement of the leaves and i imagine photographed besides the bright red walls would have made a pretty picture. Take me along the next time you get around this building…Hehe

  4. Hi, I live locally to Harringworth and also know some Harringworth folk, born and bred. They assure me that these are workers cottages built around the time of the construction of the viaduct.

    The holes in the window frame were for securing shutters, from the inside.

    The wooden post I am told is missing another post parallel to it, and a handle…and a….sharpening stone. The cut marks you see are the result of workers drawing their tools across the wood just to see how sharp they have made their blades. At least one stone still exists in one of the gardens in Harringworth.

    There are also two more huts. One is vandalised, but you should find another at the Seaton end of the viaduct.

    • Oh thank you so much for this Kenny. I will add it into my post.. and I do hope you enjoyed this series.. Did you look at them all? Please do and if you want to make any more commenst they are very welcome 🙂

  5. PS…Don’t think of the licquor as illicit…I will have to dig out my copy of the “Harringworth Millenium Book”, produced in 2000, which does talk about the viaduct. During the construction beer and licquor was in plentiful supply and pretty much written into the terms and conditions of employment!

  6. Pingback: Portrait of the Dandelion 6 – Final shots « Helen's Photomania Blog – a 366 of sorts.

  7. So lovely to see pure brickwork in a building, makes me nostalgic for England where I grew up, and so lacking in Vancouver, Canada where I live now…Thank you.

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